Open Study Discussion: Power and Injustice

For this week’s study, please read the following Scriptures:

John 18:4-8; Matt. 21:12-13; John 10:11-18 and Matt. 23:8-12

A Christian is identifiable as a Christian, in part, by their character; and character is to a great degree shaped by how we answer two questions:

  1. How do you use the power committed unto you?
  2.  How do you respond to injustices, both personal and general?
In our last two studies, we discussed the subject of judgment; and we know that a Day is coming when everyone will be judged for how they lived and the character they developed.  Bearing these things in mind, what do the above Scriptures have to teach us about a Christian’s use of power and how we are to respond to injustice?
Some additional questions:
1. Was the arrest of Jesus an example of justice? What caused all those who were gathered together to arrest Jesus to draw back and fall to the ground? (John 18:6)  What does the answer to that question imply about the reality of the situation?
2. As it applies to power and its use, what is different between the Lord’s example from John 18:4-8, and his behavior in Matt 21:12-13?
3. Putting all these Scriptures together, is a Christian expected to use power differently when responding to personal injustices versus those which broadly impact others?
4. From an eternal perspective, why is this an important topic?
May the Spirit of God guide and direct you in your study.

Open Study Discussion: Judgement

In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus made the statement, “Do not judge, or you too will be judged.”  (Matt. 7:1)  If someone today says, “Don’t judge me” when confronted regarding a particular wrong-doing, is that a proper application of the intent of Jesus’s words, or is such a usage simply a way to dismiss accountability for sin? Does “Do not judge” mean we should avoid making any type of judgements?  If not, what are some judgements we are to make?  And, if we do make them, how should those judgements be exercised?  What is the most important judgement that anyone can and should make?  What is/are the judgement(s) that we are to avoid making, that Jesus was referring to in verse 1?  Please utilize any Scriptures you can locate to support your answers.

What type of spiritual attributes would you expect to be developed in an individual who always kept verse 2 in mind when interacting with others?

Define what a hypocrite is.  How do verses 3-5 tie in to the subject of judgement?  What motivation might a person with “a plank” in their eye have for offering to remove a “speck” from their brother’s eye?  What does verse 5 teach us about dealing with sin?

Verse 6 requires discernment if it is to be put into practice, and the judgement it asks you to make is certainly not a flattering one.  Explain what you think Jesus meant.  Can you find any other statements he made that correspond to this command?  (Notice that do not is a command, not merely a suggestion)  Can you find any examples in the new testament of this principle being put into practice?

Finally, do you view verse 7 as a transition to a new and separate topic, or as a continuation of the train of thought from verses 1-6?  What is the rationale in support of your answer?

Psalm 106: Open Study Discussion

The topic for this particular study discussion is Psalm 106.

  1.  What is the purpose of this psalm?  How would you summarize it, and why do you think it was written?
  2. The author of the psalm counsels that all people should praise God, yet when he expounds upon his reasons why, he speaks only of events that occurred centuries before his lifetime, rather than providing examples of God’s personal involvement in his own life.  What might his reason(s) for doing so have been?
  3. The psalmist’s lifetime was far removed the day in which the events he referenced occurred, and today, we are more than 2,ooo years farther removed from when the psalm was written.  After the passage of so much time, what relevance does the psalm retain for you?  What lessons can still be learned from the events of which it speaks?

As I read this psalm, some of the verses that stood out to me as discussion points were verses 3, 19-20, and 36.  To my mind, the Exodus of the Israelite’s has many parallels to the trials and tests a Christian will be faced with as they walk with God.  With that in mind, here are some additional questions regarding these specific verses:

Verse 3:  Why is it so difficult to constantly do what is right?  How does one become more consistent in doing right?

Verses 19-20:  What do the gods a person worships reveal about that person?  What would you say the idol the Israelite’s cast and worshiped at Horeb indicates about them?

Verse 36 states, “They worshiped their idols, which became a snare to them.”  Since an idol is a lifeless thing, how is it possible that it could become a snare to them, or have any effect on them at all?  How might its influence manifest itself in their lives?   Construct a train of thought that connects these verses together.

As always, I look forward to your input!